Weekly Roundup Report 8/3

TASKS ACCOMPLISHED

Monday, July 30

  • groomed Ed Young trail

Tuesday, July 31

  • groomed Ed Young trail

Wednesday, August 1

  • groomed Ed Young trail

Thursday, August 1

  • groomed Ed Young trail

Friday, August 3

  • groomed Ed Young trail (final)

 

HIGHLIGHTS

GROOMING ED YOUNG TRAIL.  We finally were able to work full-time on the project we've been talking about all summer long.  At the beginning of the summer, we set a goal to groom the one trail that hasn't been completely groomed and used in years, the Ed Young trail, but only after all the other trails had been groomed up to standard.  The "Blueberry" team started on the west end of the mountain and the "Silver Bullet" team started at the other end.  Somewhere in the middle, a resident issue needed to be addressed and we needed to move the trail up the mountain several yards...basically cutting a brand new trail through thick scrub oak.  Although we didn't have time to completely groom the Ed Young trail up to standard, we moved the trail and made it passable for both horses and hikers.  The Ed Young trail is now one of the most beautiful trails in Bell Mountain Ranch.

The Silver Bullet Team

The Silver Bullet Team

The Blueberry Team

The Blueberry Team

Gavin, Todd and Jane rooming Ed Young trail.

Gavin, Todd and Jane rooming Ed Young trail.

Jerry and the final Ed Young trail crew on the last day of Ranch Hand Leadership Academy 2018.

Jerry and the final Ed Young trail crew on the last day of Ranch Hand Leadership Academy 2018.

Soilless Farming.  Bryan Downing, one the creative thinkers at the ranch, is currently creating and testing hydroponics gardening systems.  Here is a photo of Bryan with Jose, our Junior Rancher, who assisted Bryan in the assembly of three prototype systems.  Systems that grow food without soil removes the need for toxic treatment, increases long-term sustainability and saves resources like land usage, water usage and topsoil depletion.  

Bryan and Jose with the prototype soilless gardening systems.

Bryan and Jose with the prototype soilless gardening systems.

WHAT WE LEARNED

LEADERS NEED HEART.  This week's cowboy value was "heart".  We discussed how critical it is for leaders to see other people as people, not as objects.  When we are able to get outside of ourselves and look at life through the eyes of others, we then have the ability to connect with others and lead effectively with empathy.  We watched and discussed the following video and talked about how important it is as a human being to see each other and treat each other with compassion and heart.

We also read and discussed the following story of someone who pushed through her own suffering and chose to compassionately see the person who caused her suffering as a human being.  She demonstrated heart.

“How would you feel toward a teenager who decided to toss a 20-pound frozen turkey from a speeding car headlong into the windshield of the car you were driving? How would you feel after enduring six hours of surgery using metal plates and other hardware to piece your face together, and after learning you still face years of therapy before returning to normal—and that you ought to feel lucky you didn’t die or suffer permanent brain damage?

“And how would you feel after learning that your assailant and his buddies had the turkey in the first place because they had stolen a credit card and gone on a senseless shopping spree, just for kicks? …

“This is the kind of hideous crime that propels politicians to office on promises of getting tough on crime. It’s the kind of thing that prompts legislators to climb all over each other in a struggle to be the first to introduce a bill that would add enhanced penalties for the use of frozen fowl in the commission of a crime.

“The New York Times quoted the district attorney as saying this is the sort of crime for which victims feel no punishment is harsh enough. ‘Death doesn’t even satisfy them,’ he said.

“Which is what makes what really happened so unusual. The victim, Victoria Ruvolo, a 44-year-old former manager of a collections agency, was more interested in salvaging the life of her 19-year-old assailant, Ryan Cushing, than in exacting any sort of revenge. She pestered prosecutors for information about him, his life, how he was raised, etc. Then she insisted on offering him a plea deal. Cushing could serve six months in the county jail and be on probation for 5 years if he pleaded guilty to second-degree assault.

“Had he been convicted of first-degree assault—the charge most fitting for the crime—he could have served 25 years in prison, finally thrown back into society as a middle-aged man with no skills or prospects.

“But this is only half the story. The rest of it, what happened the day this all played out in court, is the truly remarkable part.

“According to an account in the New York Post, Cushing carefully and tentatively made his way to where Ruvolo sat in the courtroom and tearfully whispered an apology. ‘I’m so sorry for what I did to you.’

“Ruvolo then stood, and the victim and her assailant embraced, weeping. She stroked his head and patted his back as he sobbed, and witnesses, including a Times reporter, heard her say, ‘It’s OK. I just want you to make your life the best it can be.’ According to accounts, hardened prosecutors, and even reporters, were choking back tears” (“Forgiveness Has Power to Change Future,” Deseret Morning News, Aug. 21, 2005, p. AA3).

Jerry Van Leuven